Introduction to Film 

This course was designed by Professor Ryan Friedman as an introduction to Film Studies. I acted as a recitation leader, meeting for discussion and close analysis with the smaller groups of students as a way of complimenting their twice-weekly lectures. The syllabus below is Professor Friedman's. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

 

This course familiarizes students with the basic building blocks of film, the forms that movies use to tell stories, move viewers emotionally, communicate complex ideas, and dramatize social conflicts. It also introduces students to significant developments in film history and ways of approaching film interpretation. Our primary goal in Introduction to Film is to become skilled at thinking, talking, and writing critically about movies and, in the process, to deepen our appreciation and understanding of the film medium.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

-Weekly viewing/reading quizzes, combined scores of best 12 = 20% of final grade.

-Scene analysis essay (3-4 pp.) = 15% of final grade.

-Response essay (2 pp.) on a Wexner Center film of your choosing = 5% of final grade.

-Interpretive essay (5-6 pp.) or Midterm Exam = 20% of final grade.

-Final Exam = 25% of final grade.

-Class participation = 15% of final grade.

-Regular attendance (see policy below).

 

REQUIRED READING 

Required Reading: Richard Barsam and Dave Monahan, Looking at Movies: An Introduction to Film, Fifth Edition (Norton).

FILMS 

Citizen Kane

City of God

Do the Right Thing

Fish Tank

Hugo

Independence Day

M

Modern Times

North by Northwest

Rashomon

Selma

Stagecoach

The Thin Blue Line

Zodiac